Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, cause chronic inflammation and irritation of the digestive tract. Affecting over 1 million Americans, these disorders can cause significant physical and emotional distress due to frequent abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding [1]. A recent study in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Disease found that women who suffer from Crohn’s disease may respond differently to treatment than men [2].

The study examined how both men and women with Crohn’s disease respond to treatment with adalimumab, a common biologic therapy used to suppress the immune system and reduce inflammation [3]. The authors found that women who took adalimumab experienced more side effects than men, and were more likely to discontinue treatment as a result. Although this study was limited in scope with only 188 participants, it demonstrates a real issue in healthcare – men and women may respond differently to the same type of treatment. The authors suggest that healthcare professionals discuss realistic expectations for treatment with adalimumab, which includes full disclosure of potential side effects. Likewise, the results of this study may help guide the development of sex-specific therapies and personalized treatments for irritable bowel disease. 

 

References: 
1. Centers for Disease Control
2. Lie et al., Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017 Jan;23(1):75-81.  
3. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America  

 

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