Posted by on March 6, 2018 - 8:57am

Join us and become part of a supportive community for Chicago women in Academia and STEM!!

 

NUPF would like to invite you to a special event that focuses on addressing inequalities facing women in STEM and academia, building a community to promote gender equity, and identifying solutions for the prioritization of work and lifestyle. This event is for everyone, students, postdocs, staff and faculty from Northwestern and other institutions whatever your gender identity is!


REASONS TO PARTICIPATE:
  • Discuss the unique challenges facing women in STEM at Northwestern and nation-wide.
  • Build a community of local women in STEM and academia to promote gender equity through varied interactive sessions. 
  • Get to know ways to improve your work/life balance (maternity leave, parental support, child care, elder care, etc).
  • Find out how to address inequalities at the workplace (sexual harassment, discriminitation, wages discrepancies).
  • Learn from the life lessons and successful stories of our guest speakers who are leaders in their respective fields. 
  • Cultivate leadership skills and mentor-mentee relationships with the invited speakers. 
  • Learn about the missions of our partner organizations and upcoming local events at our exhibitors' booths. 

AGENDA:

12:00 pm: Opening address.
12:05-12:30 pm: Northwestern University benefits-specific information session.

12:30-1:00 pm: Lunch (Food/drinks provided).

1 pm-1:45 pm: "How to address inequalities faced by women in STEM and Academia", Geri R. Donenberg,  PhD, Vice Chair of Research Dept of Medicine, and Director of the Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science, UIC.
2:00-2:45 pm: Keynote presentation, Dr. Carol Tamminga M.D.Professor & Chairman, Dept Psychiatry, UT Southwestern.
2:45-3:30 pm: Talks by women leaders in STEM. Participating speakers:
  • Vicky Kalogera, PhD, Linzer Distinguished University Professor in Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University and Director of CIERA, Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics.
  • Jennifer Cole, PhD, Assistant Chair of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Associate Director of Northwestern Center for Engineering Education Research.
  • Nancy Schwarz, PhDDepartment of Pediatrics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Chicago, Director, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center.

3:30-3:45 pm: Coffee break.

3:45-4:15 pm: Talk, Teresa Woodruff, PhD, Dean and Associate Provost for Graduate Education,The Graduate School, Northwestern University.

4:15-5:15 pm: Panel discussion on women's leadership in STEM with previous speakers. 

5:15-7:00 pm: Networking event (Appetizers/drinks served).

 

Attendees will be able to directly interact with the speakers and discuss mentoring in a small group setting during the round-table networking reception.

WHEN:
March 15th 2018, 12:00 pm - 7:00 pm 


WHERE:
Conference room L South,

Prentice Women’s Hospital, 250 E Superior St

 FOR MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION, CLICK ON THIS LINK:

https://womeninstemacademiainitiative.eventbrite.com​​​

Posted by on March 5, 2018 - 9:28am

New Moms Can Help Others through Umbilical Cord Blood Donations

By Madison Lyleroehr

The role of a mother’s umbilical cord is typically complete at the end of birth. However, the blood located in the umbilical cord has been found to contain a wealth of stem cells, which are extremely valuable because of their regenerative properties. The presence of these stem cells has enabled the use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) donations in treating an increasing range of diseases, including some rare genetic conditions.

Not only can UCB stem cells be used in a variety of treatments, but collecting them is much less difficult than other sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow. Because the umbilical cord is generally expelled during the birth process, UCB collection is non-invasive, does not interfere with the birthing process, or pose additional risks to the mother or baby during birth. Furthermore, because the population of women having babies is so diverse, the collection of UCB increases the potential number of matches for patients in need of stem cell donations.

For expectant families who are interested in exploring UCB donation, various options are available. First, mothers can choose to bank their own cord blood in case close family members, such as the babies from whom the UCB was donated or their siblings, are diagnosed with a condition that can be helped by the stem cells. This option generally includes fees for processing and storage. Another option is to donate the blood publically to help others who may find themselves in need of a stem cell treatment. Families who are considering either option should begin the conversation early enough in pregnancy to have the time to consider all options and research the collection option they choose.

For more information on UCB donation, go to https://bethematch.org/support-the-cause/donate-cord-blood/.

Additional sources:

Butler, Madelyn. “Best practices: umbilical cord blood and tissue preservation: tips for patient counseling.” OB GYN News, Aug. 2017, p. 7.

Martin, Paul L., et al. “Umbilical cord blood: a guide for primary care physicians.” American Family Physician, 15 Sept. 2011, p. 661+.

 

Posted by on February 28, 2018 - 3:39pm

This March, the Women’s Health Research Institute is celebrating Women’s History Month by paying tribute to the women who have shaped the fields and science and medicine. Through a series of blog posts, we will highlight female scientists, physicians, and scholars who have furthered our understanding of health and disease.

Below we’ve compiled just a few local and national resources which support and promote women in science and medicine.

Professional Societies

Northwestern University Organizations

K-12 Students

Other Resources:

https://www.beyondcurie.com/

 

Posted by on February 27, 2018 - 3:01pm
Do you know of a woman with more than 10 years demonstrated support & mentorship of women in STEM?
Nominate a friend or colleague or yourself! 
Association for Women in Science (AWIS) Chicago membership not required. Nominations can be found here.
Submit nominations to info@awis-chicago.org by Friday, March 23, 2018.

Posted by on February 21, 2018 - 1:23pm
March 7, 2018

Webcast of the Workshop on Women's Mental Health Across the Life Course through a Sex-Gender Lens
  
#WomensMentalHealth

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Register for the webcast | Agenda

Join the Committee on Population on March 7 for a webcast on a workshop that will explore how environmental, sociocultural, behavioral, and biological factors affect women's mental health across the life course and across different racial/ethnic groups.

The workshop will include sessions on: 

  • life course framing, population patterns, measurement, and methods;
  • psychological and structural factors in women’s mental health;
  • mental health over adolescence, mid-life, and later life;
  • mental health care and policy; and
  • an agenda for advancing women’s mental health over the life course.
Please feel free to share the webcast information with your colleagues. If you have questions about the event, please contact Mary Ghitelman.
  

This event is made possible with funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health.

 

 

 

Copyright © 2018 National Academy of Sciences, All rights reserved. 
Posted by on February 20, 2018 - 8:58am

Join us and become part of a supportive community for Chicago women in Academia and STEM!!
 
NUPF would like to invite you to a special event that focuses on addressing inequalities facing women in STEM and academia, building a community to promote gender equity, and identifying solutions for the prioritization of work and lifestyle. This event is for everyone, students, postdocs, staff and faculty from Northwestern and other institutions whatever your gender identity is!


REASONS TO PARTICIPATE:
  • Discuss the unique challenges facing women in STEM at Northwestern and nation-wide.
  • Build a community of local women in STEM and academia to promote gender equity through varied interactive sessions. 
  • Get to know ways to improve your work/life balance (maternity leave, parental support, child care, elder care, etc).
  • Find out how to address inequalities at the workplace (sexual harassment, discriminitation, wages discrepancies).
  • Learn from the life lessons and successful stories of our guest speakers who are leaders in their respective fields. 
  • Cultivate leadership skills and mentor-mentee relationships with the invited speakers. 
  • Learn about the missions of our partner organizations and upcoming local events at our exhibitors' booths.
 
AGENDA:
 
12:00 pm: Opening address.
12:05-12:30 pm: Northwestern University benefits-specific information session.
12:30-1:00 pm: Lunch (Food/drinks provided).
1 pm-1:45 pm: "How to address inequalities faced by women in STEM and Academia", Geri R. Donenberg,  PhD, Vice Chair of Research Dept of Medicine, and Director of the Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science, UIC.
2:00-2:45 pm: Keynote presentation, Dr. Carol Tamminga M.D.Professor & Chairman, Dept Psychiatry, UT Southwestern.
2:45-3:30 pm: Talks by women leaders in STEM. Participating speakers:
  • Vicky Kalogera, PhD, Linzer Distinguished University Professor in Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University and Director of CIERA, Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics.
  • Jennifer Cole, PhD, Assistant Chair of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Associate Director of Northwestern Center for Engineering Education Research.
  • Nancy Schwarz, PhDDepartment of Pediatrics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Chicago, Director, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center.

3:30-3:45 pm: Coffee break.
3:45-4:15 pm: Talk, Teresa Woodruff, PhD, Dean and Associate Provost for Graduate Education,The Graduate School, Northwestern University.
4:15-5:15 pm: Panel discussion on women's leadership in STEM with previous speakers. 
5:15-7:00 pm: Networking event (Appetizers/drinks served).
 
Attendees will be able to directly interact with the speakers and discuss mentoring in a small group setting during the round-table networking reception.

WHEN:
March 15th 2018, 12:00 pm - 7:00 pm 


WHERE:
Conference room L South,

Prentice Women’s Hospital, 250 E Superior St
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION, CLICK ON THIS LINK:
 

Posted by on February 14, 2018 - 8:15pm

From phone numbers and addresses to loved one’s birthdays, we are very good at keeping track of certain numbers. However, the American Heart Association recommends adding a few more to that list in order to keep track of your heart health!

Total and HDL Cholesterol

Cholesterols are fat-like molecules that are found throughout our body. They are used as building blocks for hormones and important structural components to our cells. They are transported through our blood stream by two types of proteins: high density lipoproteins (HLD) and low density lipoproteins (LDL). Build-up of LDL cholesterol or “bad” cholesterol contributes to atherosclerosis or plaque forming in the arteries, whereas HDL or “good” cholesterol carries cholesterol back to the liver where it is broken down and removed from the body. A blood test can determine your total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol numbers. You should discuss these numbers with your doctor to see how they impact your personal heart health.  

To learn more about cholesterol, click here!  

Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is a measurement which tells us how much force is being exerted on our blood vessels with every heartbeat. It is typically recorded as two numbers: The systolic and diastolic blood pressures. This accounts for the force when the heart is contracting (in systole) or relaxing (in diastole). Normal blood pressure for adults is defined as a systolic pressure of less than 120 mmHg and a diastolic pressure of less than 80 mmHg. High blood pressure, or hypertension, can be a significant risk factor for heart disease, so it’s important to know your blood pressure and discuss it with your doctor.

To learn more about blood pressure, click here!

Blood Sugar

Blood sugar refers to the amount of glucose, a type of sugar molecular, which is found in our blood. It is the major source of energy for our cells, so it is critical that our blood sugar remain within a certain range. Health problems can occur when blood sugar becomes too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Normal fasting blood sugar levels should be between 70 – 100 mg/dL. People with high blood sugar who are pre-diabetic or diabetic are at greater risk for developing heart disease compared to those with normal blood sugar levels. Fasting blood sugar levels can be determined by a simple blood test taken at your doctor’s office.

To learn more about blood sugar, click here!

 

Body Mass Index    

Being overweight or obese can also increase the risk of developing heart disease. Body mass index (BMI) is a measurement of body fat which can be used to help you and your healthcare providers determine if you need to achieve or maintain a healthy weight. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has a BMI calculator tool you can use along with additional resources for weight management. 

Posted by on February 9, 2018 - 10:30am

Here at the Women’s Health Research Institute, we strive for sex-inclusive research in hopes of adding more women and female cells to all scientific equations. In order to improve women’s health, we must focus and raise awareness of sex differences in all facets of basic science, clinical and translational research. While we want to add more women to the forefront of scientific research, we know that in order for all of us to succeed we must focus on health for both women and men!

When we think of breast cancer, we often think of female cells or women being diagnosed and treated. There is often a disconnect in terms of males being diagnosed with breast cancer. This disconnect or confusion about males developing breast cancer could be due to the fact that less than 1% of all breast cancer is observed in males.  Women and men both have breast cells and tissue but only females develop milk-producing breasts. The likelihood of a man’s breast tissue developing cancer is one in a thousand! Due to this rare occurrence, we do not often hear the narratives of men, like this one, who have undergone breast cancer diagnoses and treatment.

Breast cancer is not the only disease that is higher in women compared to men. Autoimmune diseases in general, disproportionately impact woman compared to men specifically diseases like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. That said, men who do have autoimmune disease often have more acute symptoms

 

Since there are these big differences in the development of diseases in biologically born males and females, it’s extremely important to think about all sides of the equation when researching or treating a disease!

Sex-inclusive science and medicine is the best way to improve the health of all of us!!

 

 

Check out these sources:

Male Breast Cancer Coalition

National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.

Posted by on February 8, 2018 - 12:02pm

One key aspect to maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle is being aware of your individual cardiovascular risk factors. We know that men and women who are overweight, have high blood pressure, smoke, are diabetic, or have increased cholesterol are more likely to develop heart disease. However, there are several cardiovascular risk factors which apply only to women. Below, we take a closer look at several female-specific risk factors:

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy

Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy related such as gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia only affect 5-10% of pregnant women, but they may increase a woman’s risk of developing heart disease later in life. According to a recent study published in the journal Hypertension, women who experienced high blood pressure during pregnancy were more likely to develop high blood pressure later in life and have a higher cardiovascular disease risk profile than women whose blood pressure remained normal throughout pregnancy [1].

The authors suggest that women who experience hypertensive disorders of pregnancy be counseled on how to recognize and reduce other modifiable risk factors.

 Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a condition which occurs during pregnancy and hinders the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar. While it normally resolves after pregnancy, it may leave women with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A study which examined over 8,000 women found that those who experienced gestational diabetes during pregnancy were more likely to have low HDL or “good” cholesterol and higher levels to triglycerides – both factors which can contribute to heart disease [2]. This provides yet another example of how pregnancy-related conditions may impact heart health later in life.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder which affects women of reproductive age. In addition to causing reproductive issues such as irregular periods or infertility, women with PCOS may experience other health issues such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, or metabolic syndrome. Together, these conditions can increase a woman’s risk of developing heart disease.

Menopause

Menopause marks the end of a woman’s reproductive life cycle which is characterized by the loss of menstrual cycles and a decrease in estrogen levels.  Post-menopausal women face a greater risk of heart disease compared to pre-menopausal women due to age and the loss of estrogen. This increased risk also extends to young women who experience premature menopause or have had their ovaries removed for surgical reasons. Even though estrogen is considered “heart-protective,” the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists does not recommend that patients use hormone replacement therapy to prevent cardiovascular disease [3].

For a review on sex-specific cardiovascular risk factors, we recommend:

“Sex differences in cardiovascular risk factors and disease prevention.”

Appelman et al., Atherosclerosis. 2015; 241 (1): 211-218.

 

References:

1. Tooher et al., Hypertension. 2017; 70: 798-803.

2. Shostrom et al., Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2017; 8: 144.

3. ACOG Committee on Gynecologic Practice, 2013. No. 565. 

 
Posted by on February 7, 2018 - 8:45am

 

 

The Women's Health Research Institute would like to highlight the work of Poonam Muttreja and her organization, Population Foundation of India (PFI). PFI is a national non-governmental organization (NGO) that centers its work on policy, advocacy and research on population, health and development issues throughout India. PFI’s work has empowered women, men and their families through numerous projects that contributes to health and well-being for all, while their work also leads to numerous positive outcomes for women. PFI uses a multipronged advocacy and communication strategy, including entertainment-based mass media programmes, online digital campaigns, and outreach amongst communities.

PFI’s position is unique as they work with the Indian government at both the national and state levels, with other NGOs and throughout urban and rural communities where they deploy successful programs leading to beneficial social and behavior change.

 

 

 Poonam Muttreja is the Executive Director of PFI and has over 35 years of experience in promoting women’s rights, rural livelihoods, public advocacy, communications and behavior change.  She conceived and promoted the popular Indian television serial, Mai Kuch bhi kar sakti hoon-I, a woman, can do anything. Poonam has been a member of the Family Planning 2020 Reference Group, which is a global movement that supports the rights of women and girls around the globe to empower them to decide for themselves whether, when and how many children they may want to have. She is currently a civil society representative from India for the FP 2020 country engagement group. Before joining PFI, Poonam worked with the McArthur Foundation as India Country director where she was responsible for the Foundation’s grants in India that focused on population and development issues. Early on in her career, she founded organizations in the area of social justice (SRUTI), craft (DASTKAR) and programing on leadership (Founder Director of the Ashoka Foundation in India) specifically focusing in the field of women’s health. She serves on the board of several non-governmental organizations. In addition to Poonam’s numerous and impressive efforts in social justice outreach and development, she has a Master’s in Public Administration from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA.

Connecting through global NGOs enabling women to do better and be healthier is an important part of our mission here at the Women's Health Research Institute. 

 

Pages