It has been reported in the past that obesity (body fat mass) is  protective against osteoporosis and fracture.  However, a recent study has documented a high prevalence of obesity in postmenopausal women with fragility fracture.

An international group of researchers has presented research at the European Congress on Osteoporosis & Osteoarthritis that compares the prevalence and location of fractures in obese (Body Mass Index≥30 kg/m2) and non-obese postmenopausal women and examines specific risk factors for fracture.

A history of fracture after age 45 years was observed in 23% of obese and 24% of non-obese women. Nearly one in four postmenopausal women with fractures is obese. The upper arm, ankle and lower leg were significantly more likely to be affected in obese than non-obese women with a prevalent fracture, whereas fractures of the wrist, hip and pelvis were significantly less common than in non-obese women. When compared to non-obese women, obese women with a prevalent fracture were more likely to be current cortisone users, to report early menopause, to report fair or poor general health, to use arms to assist standing from a sitting position, and to report more than two falls in the past year.

The research demonstrates that obese postmenopausal women are almost as likely to fracture as non-obese women, and that poor mobility and increased risk of falls may play an important role. The findings have significant public health implications in view of the rapidly rising numbers of obese people in the population.

 

Tags: 

Comments

As a health care provider, the conventional wisdom has been that obese women do resistance training with any weight bearing activity by virtue of their weight alone. It is good to have a study that illustrates yet another danger of obesity, especially in terms of fractures.

Well I guess eating fish is a good way to loose weight and is one of the healthiest food with plenty of proteins. My own obesity lead me to become diabetic and now I'm struggling to go back to my normal weight.

Thank you for this post that shows obese women have nearly the same percentage of fractures. For some time, the reports gave the impression that the obese were better off. I know that is not true, so am thankful you gave these new findings. I have learned that a healthy diet is just as satisfying as one that contributes to obesity. And there are many chronic illnesses that can be helped with proper diet besides osteoporosis. Thanks again, Muryal

Interesting... I would imagine the sheer additional weight to add to the risk... since any fall is likely to result in a higher impact from a physics point of view. coupled with - as you rightly stated - the lesser mobility, making it difficult to take preventive action in any given situation... scary peter

Thank you for this post that shows obese women have nearly the same percentage of fractures. For some time, the reports gave the impression that the obese were better off. I know that is not true, so am thankful you gave these new findings. I have learned that a healthy diet is just as satisfying as one that contributes to obesity. And there are many chronic illnesses that can be helped with proper diet besides osteoporosis. Thanks again,

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.